Musee du Louvre

If you only had time to visit one museum in Paris, it should undoubtedly be the Louvre Museum. That’s because the Louvre is not only widely considered to be one of the best art museums in Europe, but one of the best in the world as well. The museum first opened its doors in 1793 and features a grand total of 35,000 works of art. Here you can get up close to a variety of art from different time periods and cultures. The Louvre features everything from Egyptian mummy tombs to ancient Grecian sculptures (including the renowned Winged Victory of Smothrace and curvaceous Venus de Milo). There are also thousands of paintings to peruse as well. Masterpieces such as “Liberty of Leading the People” by Eugene Delacroix, “The Raft of Medusa” by Théodore Géricault and Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa,” the museum’s biggest star, can be found here. You can even get a glimpse of Napolean the Third’s old apartment digs. Though you don’t necessarily have to visit the apartments to get a taste of what it was like to be a royal. Before it was a museum, the Louvre served as a royal residence for a number of French powers, including Louis XIV. It was only sometime after Louis XIV left the Louvre in favor of Versailles that the Louvre began to transform into a museum.

With such a robust art collection, the Louvre has earned the title as the most visited museum in the world (upward of 9 million per year). While visitors agree it is no doubt a must-visit attraction, with the majority more than impressed with the museum’s offerings, the crowds can be a major turn off (especially around the glass-enclosed “Mona Lisa”). Not to the point where travelers are willing to skip the Louvre altogether, but they stress going at a time where there will be fewer people (not the middle of the day on a weekend). Others said the sheer enormity of the museum can be overwhelming, so much so that covering the entire 650,000 square feet of gallery space in a day is close to impossible. The best strategy is to pick what you want to see ahead of time and grab a map so you can easily locate those works of art. Otherwise, you could easily end up spending hours wandering around waiting to run into the must-sees and miss them.

The museum is open Mondays, Thursdays and weekends from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Wednesdays and Fridays from 9 a.m. to 9:45 p.m. The Louvre is closed on Tuesdays. Admission costs 15 euros (.80) for adults and is free for visitors 17 years old and younger. If you’re visiting between October and March, save some money by planning your visit for the first Sunday of the month when admission is free. The museum is located in the city center and has its own metro stop, Louvre-Rivoli on line 1. To learn more, visit the Louvre’s website.

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